When to see eye doctor after posterior vitreous detachment?

When to see eye doctor after posterior vitreous detachment?

Macular pucker causes blurry or distorted vision and a gray or blind spot in the central vision. Follow-Up Is Needed Your eye doctor will need to follow up with you as retinal tears or detachment can occur weeks to months later after initially having a PVD.

What causes posterior capsule opacification after cataract surgery?

PCO is fairly common after cataract surgery, occurring in about 20% of patients. What causes posterior capsule opacification? During cataract surgery, your eye doctor removes the eye’s natural lens that has become cloudy.

When to see an eye doctor for PVD?

Your eye doctor will need to follow up with you as retinal tears or detachment can occur weeks to months later after initially having a PVD. Do not ignore your follow-up visits and care. You may not have any symptoms and still have developed a retinal tear, hole, or (uncommonly) a retinal detachment.

How to treat retinal detachment at the Mayo Clinic?

Pneumatic retinopexy 1 Injecting air or gas into your eye. In this procedure, called pneumatic retinopexy (RET-ih-no-pek-see),… 2 Indenting the surface of your eye. This procedure, called scleral (SKLAIR-ul) buckling,… 3 Draining and replacing the fluid in the eye. In this procedure, called vitrectomy (vih-TREK-tuh-me),…

PCO is fairly common after cataract surgery, occurring in about 20% of patients. What causes posterior capsule opacification? During cataract surgery, your eye doctor removes the eye’s natural lens that has become cloudy.

How is posterior vitreous detachment related to VMT?

To understand the mechanical causes of VMT, we should first familiarize ourselves with posterior vitreous detachment is and how it relates to VMT. The vitreous is a clear, gel-like substance (think of a jellyfish) that fills about 80 percent of the inside of the eyeball. The vitreous helps the eye maintain its round shape.

How does a retina specialist treat vitreomacular traction?

The retina specialist surgeon inserts a tiny, needle-like instrument, called a vitrector, into the eye. This instrument aspirates (sucks out) the vitreous fluid. The surgeon then refills the eye with a special saline solution that closely resembles the natural vitreous fluid in the eye.