What was the disease that killed more people than World War 1?

What was the disease that killed more people than World War 1?

On Armistice Day, 1918, the world was already fighting another battle. It was in the grip of Spanish Influenza, which went on to kill almost three times more people than the 17 million soldiers and civilians killed during WW1.

How many people were killed by the flu in 1918?

The influenza epidemic that swept the world in 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people. One fifth of the world’s population was attacked by this deadly virus. Within months, it had killed more people than any other illness in recorded history.

What was the biggest killer disease in history?

This includes early plagues such as the Plague of Justinian (541-542AC), which reportedly claimed as many as 25 million lives, and later outbreaks of the bubonic plague in 1850s, which killed over 12 million people. All-in-all plagues caused by Yersinia pestis have claimed the lives of well over the 200 million potential victims of the Black Death.

How many people died in World War 1?

World War I claimed an estimated 16 million lives. The influenza epidemic that swept the world in 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people. One fifth of the world’s population was attacked by this deadly virus. Within months, it had killed more people than any other illness in recorded history. The plague emerged in two phases.

On Armistice Day, 1918, the world was already fighting another battle. It was in the grip of Spanish Influenza, which went on to kill almost three times more people than the 17 million soldiers and civilians killed during WW1.

How did the Spanish flu affect Australia in 1918?

It spread through armies in Western Europe in 1918 in successive virulent waves and reached the rest of the world as millions of soldiers returned from active service. Due to its isolation Australia had months to prepare and according to the National Museum of Australia much early good work was done.

The influenza epidemic that swept the world in 1918 killed an estimated 50 million people. One fifth of the world’s population was attacked by this deadly virus. Within months, it had killed more people than any other illness in recorded history.

This includes early plagues such as the Plague of Justinian (541-542AC), which reportedly claimed as many as 25 million lives, and later outbreaks of the bubonic plague in 1850s, which killed over 12 million people. All-in-all plagues caused by Yersinia pestis have claimed the lives of well over the 200 million potential victims of the Black Death.