What kings died from the Black plague?

What kings died from the Black plague?

Royal Deaths from Plague

  • compiled by Susan Flantzer.
  • Joan of England.
  • Eleanor of Portugal, Queen of Aragon.
  • Jeanne of Burgundy, Queen of France.
  • Queen Jeanne II of Navarre.
  • King Alfonso XI of Castile.
  • Louis, King of Sicily.
  • Erik Magnuson, (rival) King of Sweden.

How did Joan Plantagenet die?

According to medievalist Norman Cantor, in his book The Last Knight: The Twilight of the Middle Ages and the Birth of the Modern Era (2004), Joan actually died in Bordeaux, where the mayor, in an effort to arrest the plague, set fire to the port, burning the Plantagenet castle there as well.

Did Queen Elizabeth 1 have the plague?

On 10th October 1562, twenty-nine year-old Queen Elizabeth I was taken ill at Hampton Court Palace, with what was thought to be a bad cold. However, the cold developed into a violent fever, and it became clear that the young queen actually had smallpox.

Who Important died from the Black Death?

Famous People who have died from Bubonic Plague (Yersinia pestis) infection: 429 BC – Pericles – Greek Statesman. 251 – Hostilian (Gaius Valens Hostilianus Messius Quintus) (Roman Emperor 251 AD) (251 AD) 664 – Saint Cedd (Missionary Bishop, Northumbria)

Did any royalty died from the Black Death?

The only member of the royal family who can be said with any certainty to have died from the Black Death was in France at the time of her infection. Edward III’s daughter Joan was residing in Bordeaux on her way to marry Pedro of Castile in the summer of 1348.

Who is Princess Joan?

Immortalised by the chronicler Froissart as the most beautiful woman in England and the most loved, Joan was the wife of the Black Prince and the mother of Richard II, the first Princess of Wales and the only woman ever to be Princess of Aquitaine.

Why did Queen Elizabeth 1 paint her face white?

It is known however that she contracted smallpox in 1562 which left her face scarred. She took to wearing white lead makeup to cover the scars.

Who was the King of Spain who died of the Black Death?

Four days later he died, having contracted the plague in France. Across Europe, other people of rank fell victim: Alphoso XI of Castile may have been one, dying during the siege of Gibraltar in 1350. Pedro IV of Aragon lost his wife, his daughter and a niece within six months, most likely due to the plague.

When did the Black Death start in Aragon?

The Black Death in Aragon is described by contemporary witnesses, such as in the chronicle of Peter IV of Aragon, and has been subjected to thorough research which has demonstrated the effect the plague could have on a society. The bubonic plague pandemic known as the Black Death reached Aragon in the spring of 1348, and lasted a year.

Why did so many royal women die during the Black Death?

During these years, a handful of royals died from the bubonic plague. Here are some royal women who died during these years. For some of them, the cause of death is not certain, but the plague seems to be the most likely cause.

Where did the King of England go after the Black Death?

The king’s physician who attended them soon fell sick and died, followed on 20 May by the chancellor before he was even consecrated as archbishop. This time, the king retired to Woodstock in Oxfordshire and the law courts were closed from 15 June to 14 July, but Edward returned to Westminster in August.

Four days later he died, having contracted the plague in France. Across Europe, other people of rank fell victim: Alphoso XI of Castile may have been one, dying during the siege of Gibraltar in 1350. Pedro IV of Aragon lost his wife, his daughter and a niece within six months, most likely due to the plague.

Who was the king of Castile during the Black Death?

The Black Death in Castile are not as well researched or documented as in Aragon and Navarre. It caused the death of king Alfonso XI of Castile in the middle of his warfare against Muslim Andalusia.

How did people die from the Black Death in Europe?

But during the short journey from Eltham, the new archbishop also became ill. Four days later he died, having contracted the plague in France. Across Europe, other people of rank fell victim: Alphoso XI of Castile may have been one, dying during the siege of Gibraltar in 1350.

The Black Death in Aragon is described by contemporary witnesses, such as in the chronicle of Peter IV of Aragon, and has been subjected to thorough research which has demonstrated the effect the plague could have on a society. The bubonic plague pandemic known as the Black Death reached Aragon in the spring of 1348, and lasted a year.