What happens if you get a cold with HIV?

What happens if you get a cold with HIV?

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, kills or damages cells in the immune system, your body’s defense against germs. That makes it tougher for you to beat back infections. When you get sick with a cold, you’re more likely to get complications, like pneumonia.

What side effects do ARVs have?

Other side effects from antiretroviral drugs can include:

  • hypersensitivity or allergic reactions, with symptoms such as fever, nausea, and vomiting.
  • bleeding.
  • bone loss.
  • heart disease.
  • high blood sugar and diabetes.
  • lactic acidosis (high lactic acid levels in the blood)
  • kidney, liver, or pancreas damage.

What kind of cold and allergy medicine do you take?

Cold & Allergy Relief is a combination medicine used to treat symptoms of the common cold or seasonal allergies, including sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, and itchy, watery eyes. Cold & Allergy Relief may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What happens when you take an antihistamine for a cold?

The histamine is what causes typical allergy symptoms such as sneezing, itching, and runny nose. These symptoms can occur with infections such as the common cold as well. When you take an antihistamine, it is supposed to block the histamine reaction and alleviate those symptoms.

What can you take for allergies if you have HIV?

Allergen avoidance is the most effective way to prevent an allergic reaction. If allergen avoidance is not possible, oral antihistamines, nasal steroid sprays, and other allergy medicines are generally considered safe if you have HIV.

What to do if you have a cold with HIV?

When you first get sick, call your doctor. There aren’t any medicines that can fight the virus that causes a cold, but he’ll recommend treatments that can ease your symptoms. A cold normally lasts about a week and goes away on its own, even in people with HIV.

Cold & Allergy Relief is a combination medicine used to treat symptoms of the common cold or seasonal allergies, including sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, and itchy, watery eyes. Cold & Allergy Relief may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

How are antihistimines used to treat cold symptoms?

Histamine is what causes typical allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, itching, and runny nose. Antihistimines block that reaction, thus alleviating allergy symptoms. But your body also uses histamines to deal with physical damage and infection, such as with common cold .

Allergen avoidance is the most effective way to prevent an allergic reaction. If allergen avoidance is not possible, oral antihistamines, nasal steroid sprays, and other allergy medicines are generally considered safe if you have HIV.

Are there over the counter products for cold and flu symptoms?

» Millions of people use over-the-counter (OTC) products to relieve symptoms of cold, flu, and allergy, including nasal stuffiness and congestion, sneezing, runny noses, sore throat, and cough.