What causes linear gingival erythema?

What causes linear gingival erythema?

Linear gingival erythema is a condition that’s related to a fungal infection of the gums. It appears as a red line along the gum line and causes pain and sometimes bleeding. This condition is one of the most common oral complications of HIV. However, people with HIV aren’t the only ones can who develop LGE.

How is linear gingival erythema treated?

The etiopathogenesis of linear gingival erythema is uncertain, although some investigators hypothesize that the condition results from subgingival colonization and tissue invasion by Candida species. Treatment may include débridement, povidone-iodine irrigation, chlorhexidine mouth rinse, and/or antifungal therapy.

Which viral infection is associated with linear gingival erythema?

Periodontal manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were first described in 1987. Initially, the lesions receiving attention were HIV-associated gingivitis (now known as linear gingival erythema [LGE]) and HIV-associated periodontitis (now known as necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis [NUP]).

What is marginal gingivitis?

Marginal gingivitis is painless but may manifest with bleeding from the gingival crevice, particularly when brushing the teeth. The gingival margins are slightly red and swollen, eventually with mild gingival hyperplasia.

What is gingival fibromatosis?

Abstract. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare disorder characterized by a benign, non-hemorrhagic, fibrous gingival overgrowth that can appear in isolation or as part of a syndrome. Clinically, a pink gingiva with marked stippling can be seen to cover almost all the tooth, in many cases preventing eruption …

What does it mean if you have sore gums?

Brushing too hard, improper flossing techniques, infection, or gum disease can cause sore and sensitive gums. Other causes unrelated to oral hygiene could include a Vitamin K deficiency, hormonal changes during pregnancy, leukemia or blood disorders.

What is necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis?

Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) is a painful infection of the gums, causing fever, sometimes foul-smelling breath, and feeling ill. If the normal bacteria in the mouth overgrow, the gums can become infected. The gums hurt, and people sometimes have extremely bad breath.

What is hereditary gingival fibromatosis?

Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare disorder characterized by a benign, non-hemorrhagic, fibrous gingival overgrowth that can appear in isolation or as part of a syndrome. Clinically, a pink gingiva with marked stippling can be seen to cover almost all the tooth, in many cases preventing eruption.

What is ANUG?

Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) is a painful infection of the gums, causing fever, sometimes foul-smelling breath, and feeling ill. If the normal bacteria in the mouth overgrow, the gums can become infected.

How is gingival fibromatosis treated?

HGF does not resolve spontaneously and the treatment of choice is gingivectomy, which can be performed with an internal or external bevel incision (2,5). Performing surgery after eruption of the permanent teeth reduces the rate of recurrence (2).

What are the symptoms of Linear gingival erythema?

Severe gingivitis (linear gingival erythema) and periodontitis (necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis) have been observed in patients with HIV disease.237 The onset of symptoms is often insidious but may be abrupt. Pain is often severe; patients may note foul breath, bleeding gums, and loosening of teeth.

What causes a red line on the gingiva?

Physical examination may reveal a bright red marginal line on the gingiva, necrosis and ulceration of interdental papillae, gingival erosion, exfoliation of enamel, and loose teeth. The cause of gingivitis and periodontitis is unclear.

What are the signs and symptoms of gingiva hyperplasia?

Most commonly this induced by plaque. Associations : Gingiva with erythematous or cyanotic hyperplasia +/- necrosis, bleeding or petechiae + elevated leukocyte count along with low hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets.

What is the pathophysiology of gingival overgrowth?

Pathophysiology : It is an inherited autosomal dominant trait that is low in incidence resulting in gingival overgrowth due to excessive collagen production in the gingival corium. Pathophysiology : Inflammation involving the mucosal epithelial tissue around the cervical portion of the teeth and alveolar process.