What are the factors in the emergence of infectious diseases?

What are the factors in the emergence of infectious diseases?

Morse SS, Schluederberg A. From the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health, and the Rockefeller University. Emerging viruses: the evolution of viruses and viral diseases.

How does the emergence and reemerging of viral diseases affect society?

The emergence and reemergence of novel pathogens are associated with the complicated host-pathogen environment and microbe co-evolution with their host. Emergence/reemergence of human viral disease is a never-ending challenge, affecting the social and economic development of a country.

How are viruses a part of human evolution?

The pathogens including viruses, parasites and other microbes, are known to emerge and evolve since thousands of the years ago. Viruses are potent infectious agents causing numerous life-threatening diseases in human beings and co-evolved with human evolution.

Which is an example of an emerging disease?

It comes as no surprise, then, that several prominent recent examples of emerging or re-emerging diseases are caused by RNA viruses. However, a complex interplay of factors can influence disease emergence.

What are the factors that influence the emergence of a virus?

However, a complex interplay of factors can influence disease emergence. In addition to virus genetic variation (mutation, recombination, and reassortment), environmental factors (including ecological, social, health care, and behavioral influences) can play important roles.

What are the causes of emerging infectious diseases?

Emerging infections can be caused by: Previously undetected or unknown infectious agents Known agents that have spread to new geographic locations or new populations Previously known agents whose role in specific diseases has previously gone unrecognized.

How does travel contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases?

Many factors contribute to the emergence of infectious diseases. Those frequently identified include microbial adaptation and change, human demographics and behavior, environmental changes, technology and economic development, breakdown in public health measures and surveillance, and international travel and commerce (1 – 4).

How does population growth lead to spread of infectious diseases?

For example, population movement from rural areas to cities can spread a once-localized infection. The strain on infrastructure in the overcrowded and rapidly growing cities may disrupt or slow public health measures, perhaps allowing establishment of the newly introduced infection.