How long does it take to recover from meningitis in adults?

How long does it take to recover from meningitis in adults?

Most people who get mild viral meningitis usually recover completely in 7 to 10 days without treatment. Antiviral medicine may help people with meningitis caused by viruses such as herpesvirus and influenza.

Is it possible for a person to recover from meningitis?

In these cases, follow-up care and recovery will be unique to that person. Most people will make a good recovery from meningitis. However for many, they recover from the acute phase of the illness only to find that whilst trying to get back to their everyday activities, they experience some difficulties

What are the long-term effects of meningitis?

After-effectsSerious and potential long-term after-effects of meningitis are usually identified whilst a person is still in hospital. In these cases, follow-up care and recovery will be unique to that person. Most people will make a good recovery from meningitis.

How long is meningitis contagious after close contact?

Some types of meningitis are contagious, but normally only for 10-14 days after infection and it takes close contact like kissing or sneezing on someone to pass on the germs. You could encourage your friends to get the meningitis jab if they’re worried about their health and safety.

How can I help my child recover from meningitis?

For children we have ‘My Journal’ and ‘Your Guide ‘, resources that allow you to keep track of their recovery, follow-up appointments and continued care and support. Serious and potential long-term after-effects of meningitis are usually identified whilst a person is still in hospital.

How long does it take to recover from meningitis?

In most cases, there is no specific treatment for viral meningitis. Most people who get viral meningitis completely recover on their own within 7 to 10 days.

What is the survival rate for meningitis?

The mortality rate for meningococcal meningitis is around 5-10% with good treatment or as high as 50% without treatment. Meningococcal septicemia is blood poisoning with the bacteria (see septicemia or bacteremia) and, although less common, is actually more severe than the meningitis.

How does meningitis affect the brain?

In very bad cases, meningitis injures or destroys nerve cells and causes brain damage. This is due to the raised pressure on your brain and the toxic effect of the bacterial poisons on your brain cells, as well as reduced blood supply and formation of blood clots in blood vessels of the brain.