How does a lesion form?

How does a lesion form?

Primary skin lesions are abnormal skin conditions present at birth or acquired over a person’s lifetime. Secondary skin lesions are the result of irritated or manipulated primary skin lesions. For example, if someone scratches a mole until it bleeds, the resulting lesion, a crust, is now a secondary skin lesion.

What is skin lesion?

Skin lesions are areas of skin that look different from the surrounding area. They are often bumps or patches, and many issues can cause them. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery describe a skin lesion as an abnormal lump, bump, ulcer, sore, or colored area of the skin.

What does it mean to have a lesion on your skin?

A skin lesion is a broad term that refers to any abnormality on your skin. Medical dictionaries define skin lesion as a superficial growth or patch of the skin that does not resemble the area surrounding it. Skin lesions can be a rash, mole, wart, cyst, blister, bump, discoloration, or other changes that you may notice on your skin.

Which is the correct definition of a primary lesion?

Primary skin lesions are defined as those that vary in color and texture. Compared to secondary skin lesions, primary lesions include the more typical surface lesions we are familiar with like blisters, cysts and “pimples” or pustules. 2. Correctly name what the ABCs of skin lesions stand for: is correct.

What are the different types of secondary skin lesions?

Secondary skin lesions are the result of irritated or manipulated primary skin lesions. For example, if someone scratches a mole until it bleeds, the resulting lesion, a crust, is now a secondary skin lesion. Many conditions can cause different types of skin lesions. Here are 21 possible causes and types. Warning: Graphic images ahead.

What are some skin lesions that are hereditary?

Some skin lesions are hereditary, such as moles and freckles. Birthmarks are lesions that exist at the time of birth. Others can be the result of an allergic reaction, such as allergic eczema and contact dermatitis.